Wednesday, January 2, 2013

A Thousand Words by Christi

Chaires Cross-
Green Hill Chaires set up his second cotton plantation Evergreen Hills on the land that is now simply referred to as Chaires. His first plantation was burned to the ground and the women and children were killed, including his wife, during a raid by some Native Americans who had asked that his plantation not be built on a specific hillside. Green Hill Chaires ignored this request and was met with swift recourse in 1838. There is a cemetery north of Lake Lafayette where the family members are buried, eerily with the same date on all markers. Green Hill Chaires donated tracts of his land for the railroad companies, and many Tallahassee residents cross over these tracts on their commute to this day.

The Old Dead Tree-
This is just a crooked tree. It sits on the bank just past the Saint Marks Lighthouse. In stark contrast to an otherwise linear composition, somehow the setting winter sun gave this dead tree new life.


Mexico Beach Pier -
The first accounts of settlement of Mexico Beach is a short lived French fort in 1718, followed by turpentine mogul Felix du Pont in the early twentieth century. This area was largely uninhabited until rumors began to spread about buried treasures and sunken ships. Although a ship was discovered in the local waters at that time, all records of its contents have been lost. Highway 98 was built in the 1930's which allowed public thoroughfare to the formerly hidden sands of Mexico Beach.


Stoic-
The flat waters of this salt marsh are the perfect backdrop for this double take.

Brush Fire-
Layered hues of pink, gold, purple, orange stand is stark contrast to the black silhouette of the slash pines to create this abstract sunset near the San Marcos De Apalachee State Park.

Lake Buttercup-
Located on the northeast edge of the Apalachicola Bay, this natural spring has housed the secrets of moonshiners, renegades, and maybe even Cebe Tate himself. I found myself there one evening in early winter, and woke to the the polar smoke dissipating in the sunrise.
all text and images by Christi Cofield

1 comment:

  1. Your stuff just gets more and more amazing, and I can never pick a favorite. LOVE this!

    ReplyDelete